Tips for Keeping Your Newborn Healthy During the Winter Season

January 17, 2012

By Mommy101, LLC

 

1. Hand washing. 

You can never wash your hands enough. Make sure everyone washes his or her hands before handling a newborn.  Encourage frequent hand washing and don’t forget to wash your hands after each diaper change.

 

2. Breastfeeding 

       Breast milk is packed with disease-fighting substances (antibodies) that protect your baby from illnesses. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months to help infants have a healthful start in life. Numerous studies from around the world have shown that infants who breastfeed have fewer illnesses, and are less severe when they do occur. Colostrum (the first milk your body produces) contains immunities, which guard against germs by forming a protective layer on your baby's mucous membranes in his intestines, nose, and throat. This is why it's important to start nursing your baby right after birth. 

 

3. Stay away from crowded areas

       It is always surprising how readily people in public reach out and touch new babies with no concern for germs.  If you take your infant out to a crowded area put the infant in a baby sling carrier.  People are more reluctant to touch a baby that is up against an adult as compared to lying in a stroller.  Or consider putting a net over the stroller or car seat cover to deter people from touching your newborn.

      

4. Avoid sick people

Encourage family and friends who are feeling a “little under the weather” to stay home and away from your newborn.  They are certainly welcome to come back when they are well.

 

5. Older Siblings

       We can’t keep all of the germs out of the house, especially if there are older siblings.  Encourage big brothers/sisters to kiss their baby sibling on the top of their head, not on their hands or feet, which can easily go in the baby’s mouth.

 

6. Doctor’s offices

       If you need to take your newborn to the pediatrician please be aware of the sick children in the office.  Avoid busy times of the day such as before and after school, when school-age